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Eating in Space - at the International Space Station

Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield

Chris Hadfield Canadian Astronaut

Holy Crap cereal was one of 12 Canadian foods that won the Canadian Space Agency Snacks in Space contest. The cereal will be on Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield’s menu at the International Space Station during his mission between December 2012 and May 2013.

“We’re thrilled that Riley, a Grade Four Abbotsford, BC student suggested our Holy Crap cereal be sent to the International Space Station,” says Corin Mullins, CEO of HapiFoods Group. “We originally developed the cereal for emergency kits because of its healthy nutritional content and long shelf-life so it seems more than fitting for it to go to the Space Station.”

Contestants were invited to submit ideas for Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield to take on the December 2012 space mission to the International Space Station. The food items had to meet a list of criteria for suitability in space. They had to be Canadian made, have a long shelf life and be simple to prepare.

Riley’s contest entry read in part, “Holy Crap cereal (this is not a joke): You add either water or milk or soy milk. It is an awesome, great tasting, very healthy snack.” The Canadian Space Agency website says, "While Chris Hadfield is living on the ISS, he and his crew members will be able to enjoy some Canadian foods.

Most of the Canadian foods are flying in bonus containers and will be delivered to the ISS in the fall of 2012 and winter of 2013." "The Canadian menu for Expedition 33/34/35 is made up of Canadian foods that have flown on previous missions (Expedition 19/20 and STS-127) and new foods that were identified through a market survey, conducted in 2010 to 2011, and the Snacks for Space contest, conducted in 2011."

"To select the Canadian menu for Expedition 33/34/35 Canadian Space Agency (CSA) experts evaluated a wide selection of Canadian foods to determine if they met spaceflight criteria and ranked them based on taste, color, odor and texture."

The key spaceflight criteria included (but were not limited to):

  • long shelf-life
  • does not produce many crumbs
  • can be prepared on orbit using the ISS galley (water dispenser, convection oven)
  • can be easily consumed on orbit.
Read more about Eating in Space

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